Monthly Archives: January 2012

#namethatshape2012

#namethatshape2012

Last week, I received a tweet from @msmensing asking when my class would be hosting another Twitter chat. I thought that it would be great to do one this week to allow the students to apply their new found shape knowledge with what they’ve learned in writing. Inspired by Aaron Puley (@bloggucation) and his recent use of Storify, here’s a Storify story of our shape tweeting from today (read from the bottom up, just like in a real Twitter conversation):

The amazing part of this is that even though very few classes joined in with us today, students still carried on the conversation with each other. They used our two class Twitter accounts (@avivadunsiger and @avivadunsiger2) as well as my own account (@grade1) to tweet. Students were reading and writing in a meaningful way, and really enjoying themselves throughout the process too. I love these weekly Twitter chats to reinforce skills learned in class and encourage meaningful dialogue in a written format.

Now, the only question is, what should we talk about next week?
Aviva

Winnie the Pooh and Science Experiment Day

Winnie the Pooh and Science Experiment Day

On Friday, we had two special days in our division. The Grade 1 students had Winnie the Pooh Day to celebrate A.A. Milne’s birthday. The Grade 2 students had a Science Experiment Day to complete our science unit on Liquids and Solids. Students loved working and learning with other students from the seven different classes involved. Here’s an Animoto slideshow capturing some of the activities that the students did on this special day:

Listen here as one of the Grade 2 students explains his thinking at a “mixing liquids” centre:

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It’s great when the students apply what they’ve already learned in class to create some new knowledge.

When our day was over, I had my Grade 2 students reflect on what they learned. Here’s a short video of their reflections:

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It’s wonderful to hear the students discussing their learning and inferring why things may have happened the way that they did.

What did your child enjoy the most about this special day? Now that the day is over, what does your child want to continue to learn? I’d love to hear your thoughts!

Aviva

Making Changes

Making Changes

A while ago now, I had a great conversation online with Chris Wejr, a principal in British Columbia, William Chamberlain, a teacher from Missouri, and many others. We spoke about the values and drawbacks of keeping lessons the same over the years versus changing them. I mentioned that I rarely do the same thing twice, at least in the same way. While this is true, an activity that worked well, I may do again, but usually tweaking it to meet the needs of my current group of students.

I thought about this discussion this week when I coordinated a Shape Hunt for my Grade 1/2 class. Last year, we did this hunt as an introductory lesson too, but this year, I made some important changes:

1) Students worked in partners instead of on their own. I wanted students to continually dialogue about shapes, and I thought that if they worked on their own, this wouldn’t happen. In a group of two, they had to discuss what pictures they were taking and why, and this helped! We got some great “math talk.”

2) Students used various tools to take the photographs, and in some cases, videos. Last year, all of the students used Palm Treos to take these photographs. This year though, as a class we’ve really discussed the benefits of multiple tools for learning. Students feel comfortable with using various tools, and they see the value in different tools too. As a result, I had some groups using Palm Treos, some groups using iPod Touches, some groups using digital cameras, and some groups using flipcams. Groups chose which tool they used.

3) Students traded tools throughout the Shape Hunt. I encouraged students to do this, as I wanted them to experiment with different ways of documenting their thinking. While sometimes they were taking photographs, other times they were recording videos, and this helped shape some of their discussions too.

4) I challenged students throughout the process to find different shapes based on different clues that I provided. Sometimes I focused in on the number of sides or vertices, sometimes I just wanted them to find multiple shapes in a given area, and sometimes I asked them to find objects that were the same shapes as other objects. With my own professional learning focus on math this year, I think that I’ve taken an even closer look at the Math Curriculum Documents, and I had an even better understanding of what expectations I wanted students to meet as a part of this activity. While last year, I was just glad that students were finding shapes in their environment, this year, I wanted them to talk about the properties of shapes too. Giving clues helped guide some of the discussion, and I quickly got a good understanding of which students already know the properties of shapes and which students were having more difficulty with this.

5) I added a global component to the activity, and I opened our Shape Hunt up to other classes that wanted to participate through Twitter. Using the hashtag #shapes2012, classes could tweet us clues about shapes and we would tweet back replies with photographs of the shapes. The students used the cameras on the iPod Touches to do this. It was the first time that students tweeted out photographs, but combining the visual of the picture with the written explanation was great! The only problem is that we had some issues with the tweetstream updating on time, so we missed a lot of the tweets on our Shape Hunt. The students adjusted though, and still shared photographs and information. Ideally, they would have added more information about the shapes, but I think that this could have worked better if the hashtag was updating as usual for us, and we could have had discussions with other students and classes. The next time, I’d also bring along an iPod Touch or iPad, where I can tweet out questions for the students to respond to as well. This might extend the discussion around shapes.

The great thing is that even without my students participating in the discussion in the tweetstream, the discussion still evolved with other teachers and classes tweeting away about shapes. We can now go back and add to the discussion, or even encourage another Twitter chat on another similar topic. In fact, on Tuesday, students are going to be tweeting using the hashtag #namethatshape2012, where they describe shapes that they see in the classroom, and see if others can guess the shapes. I’m hoping that this will lead to an even bigger discussion on the properties of shapes.

Last year’s lesson was a success, but this year’s one was even more so because of the added components. Students really started talking about shapes and the similarities and differences that they see when comparing different shapes. The only thing that bothered me is that the majority of students that recorded videos ended up with ones such as the one below:

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Videos such as this one show me that the students know the names of the shapes, but they don’t record the good discussion that was actually happening in the hallway on shapes. So why did this happen? I think that I need to be more specific with what information I want recorded. Maybe I can give the students a list of guiding questions that can help them as they record. Had I provided questions such as what are the properties of the shapes, what other objects are the same shapes, and how do you know that this shape is a ________________, would it have resulted in a different video outcome? I think that the answer is, “yes.”

I’ll know this for the next time though, and I’ll know it for future activities as well. It’s a hard decision, as I want the students to have that spontaneous “math talk,” but I also want to guide those that don’t know what to say. Maybe I need to ensure that I spend the most time with those that are recording videos, so that I can ask the questions if needed and/or let the discussion continue as is if the questions aren’t required. What do you think? What would you do?

Already I know that I would do this activity again another year, but with changes in place to make it better. As teachers, we encourage our students to take risks, reflect on decisions, and make changes accordingly. I’m glad that I can show my students that I do the same thing as a teacher too.

What lessons have you kept the same over the years? How have you changed them to make them even better? I’d love to hear your stories!

Aviva

Why Blog?

Why Blog?

I’ve blogged for a while now, but Wednesday morning I got a whole new appreciation for blogging. On Tuesday night, I’d shared some videos on my student blogs about problem-solving in math. I emailed our Math Facilitator with the link to these videos. She left a very interesting comment:

This got me thinking: would the students choose different tools? If I asked them to show their thinking in more than one way, would they be able to? What tools would they choose to use?

I then waited two days, and gave them this question:

Today is the 81st day of school. How many days are left until the 100th day of school? Show your thinking using pictures, numbers, and words. Solve this problem in at least two different ways.

Students worked in partners to solve this problem and explain their thinking. Below are a couple of videos of students telling me about what they did:

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This activity produced some interesting results. Almost all of the groups chose to use the hundreds chart first. Many groups then chose the measuring tape to help them solve the problem. Very few groups chose to count on or count backwards using manipulatives. Only one group chose to use the base 10 blocks to solve this problem.

If it wasn’t for Kelly’s comment on my blog post, I would have never thought of doing an activity like this one. She inspired me to try something new, and as a result, I now know what I need to do next in the classroom. I need to model other ways of solving similar counting problems. I need to encourage students to use multiple tools to solve the same problem. Kelly helped me figure out my own next steps.

A blog really can be such a powerful learning tool. It’s amazing how much a single comment can help you change. Have you ever had a similar experience? I’d love to hear about your blogging experiences too!

Aviva